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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Special Report -> 
Shenzhen’s ‘can-do’ drive forges new ground
    2018-05-26  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

Like the birth of the universe, China’s economic miracle, made possible by 40 years of reform and opening up envisioned by late Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, also began with a big bang.

On July 8, 1979, a huge explosion blew up mountains in Shekou, a small village in southwestern Shenzhen. The flattened land and scattered earth, used to fill in the sea, were used to create the infrastructure for China’s first industrial zone.

When Shenzhen took off as China’s first special economic zone in 1980, its GDP was less than 200 million yuan (US$31.3 million), or less than 0.2 percent of that in neighboring Hong Kong — one of the world’s wealthiest cities.

By 2017, Shenzhen’s GDP was more than 10,000 times larger, reaching 2.2 trillion yuan — nearly the same as Hong Kong’s — making it the third-richest Chinese mainland city, behind Shanghai and Beijing, according to the National Bureau of Statistics.

“The success of Shenzhen proves that reform and opening up is the correct path for building a strong and wealthy nation,” said Wang Weizhong, the city’s Party chief.

With strong leadership and support from the Communist Party of China Central Committee, the people of Shenzhen were able to carve out a path toward prosperity with forward thinking, innovation, and inclusive and reform-focused policies, he added.

At first, Shenzhen’s fortunes were made mostly through labor-intensive manufacturing, producing goods from clothes to electronics for foreign brands. But in the past decade, Shenzhen has become the epicenter of China’s technology and finance boom, with a focus on making advanced, high-value products.

The metropolis of more than 12 million people, with an average age of around 33, is now home to more than 11,000 national high-tech enterprises, ranging from biotech to advanced electronics, according to Shenzhen’s statistics bureau. Tech giants such as Tencent, Huawei and ZTE have made Shenzhen their headquarters and the city is forging new ground in education and artificial intelligence.

Good life

Wu Jinqing, 80, said the good life he is now living in Yumin Village, Luohu District, was unimaginable when he was a child.

The barren fishing hamlet that Wu grew up in is now one of the richest villages in China, with high-rise apartments and modern security systems. He earns around 600,000 yuan a year from his share of the rental income from properties owned by the village.

“We used to live on our fishing boats and feared typhoons the most because we couldn’t stay on the boat when they hit,” Wu said.

Wu was around 10 years old when he traveled with his parents on a 5-meter by 2-meter fishing boat from Dongguan, north of Shenzhen, in search of better fishing spots. The boat was their entire livelihood and Wu’s family had only 2 square meters of room to live in because the rest of the boat was filled with fishing equipment.

Yumin Village is near the northern border of Hong Kong. “At night, villagers could see the city lights from Hong Kong. Modernity felt so close that we could reach out and grab it, yet it was so far away,” said Huang Xingyan, the deputy general manager of Yufeng Asset Holdings, the village’s property manager.

The village’s fortune changed dramatically in 1978. Thanks to flexible pilot policies, villagers began conducting limited business with Hong Kong, and soon organized transport lines to support Yumin’s booming fish farms and manufacturing industry.

By the early 1980s, villagers had televisions, fridges, stereos and electric cookers — all luxuries at the time. While other Chinese citizens earned around 900 yuan a year, Yumin villagers were earning more than 10,000 yuan, according to the National Bureau of Statistics.

In 1992, Yumin villagers experimented with community management by forming Yufeng Asset Holdings. Each villager then became a shareholder in the company. Shenzhen’s economic boom saw demand for rental properties soar, and Huang said the villagers all receive hefty dividends each year.

Education reform

Talent has been key to Shenzhen’s development, but the prosperous city lacked indigenous high-level research and education institutions, which limited its ability to produce quality talent and original work.

To remedy the situation, the Shenzhen government established the Southern University of Science and Technology, known as SUSTech, in 2011 to cultivate innovative minds in the fields of science and technology and serve as a testing ground for China’s most radical educational reforms.

SUSTech now ranks as the third-best university in Guangdong Province and 43rd in the nation in terms of overall rating, but it tops the nation in terms of the quality and influence of the scientific papers it produces, according to the Academic Ranking of World Universities.

“Thanks to reforms, SUSTech has completed 50 years’ worth of development in just seven years,” said Li Fengliang, the university’s deputy Party chief.

The reforms at SUSTech range from student admissions to school administration, Li said, and the “experience learned here will be invaluable in improving China’s overall higher education system.”

There were around 26 million college students in China last year while the ratio of professors to students at universities is typically one to several hundred, at SUSTech the ratio is around one to 10, Li said.

SUSTech has around 4,300 students and 500 faculty members. The students are accepted based on a unique “631” criteria, which means 60 percent of the decision is based on grades from the National College Entrance Exam, 30 percent on SUSTech’s own entrance exam, and 10 percent on the student’s high school grades.

AI advances

On the afternoon of Jan. 26, 2017, the police bureau in Longgang District received a call from a worried father who said his 3-year-old son had been kidnapped.

The police reviewed security footage from the area where the child was last seen and found that a middle-aged woman had taken him. Using facial recognition software, they were able to identify the woman and track her to the railway station where she boarded a train to Wuhan, Hubei Province, about 1,000 kilometers away.

The Shenzhen police contacted security staff at the railway station in Wuhan. At 6 a.m. the next day, the woman was caught on the train and the child was flown back home. The entire rescue, from the father’s call to returning home, took just 15 hours.

It is just one of thousands of cases in which artificial intelligence from IntelliFusion, a tech company in Shenzhen, has helped solve a crime. Since the start of 2017, the company’s facial recognition and security cameras have helped solve more than 4,000 cases throughout Shenzhen, 500 of which were criminal.

“Reviewing security footage with human eyes is very time-consuming, and lighting, shadows, and other factors can greatly affect accuracy and efficiency,” said Chen Ning, the company’s founder. “But AI is tireless and adaptive, it can find the right suspect from billions of photos in seconds, and cross-check thousands of photos to piece together a suspect’s obscured features.”

AI will dramatically improve the efficiency of police work and urban management, especially in crowded areas such as airports, train stations and shopping malls, Chen said. The system has now been implemented in 20 major cities and provinces throughout China.

In the Futian Bonded Zone, four self-driving buses were tested in a trial operation in 2017. By the end of 2018, four more will be added, said Hu Jianping, the president of Haylion Technology, the bus’ developer.

Launched in December, the 1.2-km self-driving bus route was the first in the world to run autonomous buses. The smart buses, about half the size of a regular bus, are designed to run at up to 30 kilometers per hour.

Equipped with sensors, cameras, and GPS antennas, the buses can avoid hitting pedestrians, vehicles and barriers, safely change lanes and stop at designated locations, although a driver still needs to be at the wheel in case of emergency. (China Daily)

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