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在线翻译:
szdaily -> World Economy -> 
Sporting events put Japanese businesses in the mood for love
    2018-05-29  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

AS Japan gears up to host the Rugby World Cup and Olympic Games in consecutive years, many businesses in the country are seizing on the opportunity to capitalize on the influx of tourists, media and athletes for both big events.

The Rugby World Cup kicks off in September 2019 followed by the Tokyo Olympic Games 10 months later, giving Japanese businesses a unique chance to reach an international and diverse customer base that may be encountering Japanese products for the first time.

One business sector looking to benefit from the arrival of thousands of athletes is the local condom industry.

It has become tradition in the lead-up to Olympic Games for tournament organizers to distribute thousands of free prophylactics to athletes looking to let their hair down once their event is over.

Almost half a million condoms were handed out in the 2016 Rio Games Olympic Village.

With roughly 10,000 athletes expected to descend on the Olympic Village, once described by gold medal-winning Australian target shooter Mark Russell as “the most testosterone fueled place on earth,” Japanese condom companies are keen to promote their unique products to an international audience.

Sagami Rubber Industries, one of Japan’s leading condom makers, are hoping to use the Olympics to enhance awareness of their ultra-thin Polyurethane sheaths. Sagami, alongside Japanese competitor Okamoto, produce the world’s thinnest condoms, which are only 0.01 millimeters thick.

“Only two firms, Sagami and Okamoto, are producing the 0.02 and 0.01 millimeter condoms and so we think the Olympics are a good opportunity to show this Japanese quality all over the world,” Sagami senior sales manager Hiroshi Yamashita said.

Britain’s Durex — the official sponsor for London 2012 — U.S. brand Trojan and Australia’s Ansell are the major players on the international market but Yamashita believes Okamoto and Sagami are next in line.

Yamashita spoke of the popularity of the ultra-thin condoms in neighboring China and believes Tokyo 2020 can help broaden Sagami’s scope worldwide. Olympic organizers have yet to name an official condom supplier.

“If the International Olympic Committee ask us, then we would be very happy to supply our product for the Tokyo 2020 Games,” said Yamashita, who predicts 150,000 condoms will be needed.

One place where these condoms could end up being used is at one of Japan’s notorious “love hotels” as Tokyo 2020 organizers face an expected shortage of accommodation.

Japan is already dealing with record numbers of tourists — 28.69 million in 2017 — and the government has set a goal of 40 million foreign visitors by 2020.

In order to satisfy the needs of this influx, the government are keen for tourists to use alternative means of accommodation, such as love hotels, capsule hotels and traditional Japanese inns.

Many customers are finding themselves drawn to Japan’s love hotels: short-stay hotels with themed rooms that can be reached through discreet entrances, out of curiosity as much as need, Booking.com says. (SD-Agencies)

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