-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen -> 
Bosnia and Herzegovina: the heart of southeast Europe
    2018-05-29  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

The word “balkanize” means to divide a territory or country into smaller, usually contentious and ineffectual areas. The word derives from the name of the Balkan Peninsula, an area of southeast Europe where countries have frequently formed and reformed.

Today’s country, Bosnia and Herzegovina, is one which has bucked the trend of “smaller” by merging two regions which had historically been part of various countries, including Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman Empire, as well as more recently Yugoslavia. When the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia dissolved in 1992, Bosnia and Herzegovina became independent, along with what is now called Serbia and Montenegro, as well as Croatia, Slovenia, and Macedonia. Balkanization is alive and well!

Bosnia and Herzegovina (which can also be called “Bosnia-Herzegovina,” or informally just “Bosnia”) is located south and east of Croatia, and west of Serbia and Montenegro. It has a 20-kilometer coastline on the Adriatic Sea to the southwest, splitting the main body of Croatia from an exclave to the south, an oddity which results from a series of treaties stretching back to 1699.

Bosnia-Herzegovina has no official language, though the three mutually intelligible languages of Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian are used by the people, depending on their ethnicity. Outsiders have sometimes designated this matrix “Serbo-Croatian,” a usage not sanctioned inside the country.

Bosnia has an unusual leadership: a three-member presidency with a rotating chairmanship. The presidency is made up of one representative from each of the three main ethnic groups.

Given the instability of the region (the most recent major upheaval, the Bosnian War, lasted from 1992 to 1995, and there were large protests in 2014), it’s pleasing to learn that the quality of life for Bosnians is pretty good. They enjoy a high literacy rate, long life expectancy, and good education, and the U.N.’s World Tourism Organization expects the country to have the world’s third-highest growth rate in tourism between 1995 and 2020.

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. joining, coming together

2. system, environment in which something occurs

3. officially permitted, approved

4. strange thing

5. not effective, powerless

6. tending to argue, quarrelsome

7. able to be understood by each other

8. agreements between states

9. the usual way something is stated

10. went against the usual way

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn