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在线翻译:
szdaily -> World Economy -> 
Big firms in US working to counter Trump’s tariff plans
    2018-07-23  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

BIG companies in the United States from Amazon.com Inc. to Toyota Motor Corp. and Alcoa Corp. are working to counter the effect of the Trump administration’s trade policies and to head off new tariffs.

Companies are attempting to avoid any confrontation with U.S. President Donald Trump but want to exert as much influence as they can to dissuade him from tearing up trade agreements or introducing tariffs on a wide swath of imports.

Amazon, the world’s largest online retailer and cloud-computing company, which could be hurt by tariffs on items sold through its website and components for its data centers, is discussing industry-wide advertising campaigns and more extensive government lobbying, a source familiar with the matter said.

Toyota Motor North America, a subsidiary of Japan’s Toyota, which could suffer if Trump follows through on a plan to impose tariffs on imported vehicles and parts, flew workers to Washington for a rally this week in front of the U.S. Capitol while the unit’s chief has met key members of Congress in recent weeks to discuss the potential impact of tariffs.

Executives from General Motors Co., which could be hurt if Trump pulls the United States out of the North American Free Trade Agreement or if he imposes auto tariffs, have also held meetings with the administration and Congress over the last year to raise its concerns about trade issues.

Those already suffering from the Trump administration’s tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, which went into effect in June, are also pushing for relief in private. (SD-Agencies)

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