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在线翻译:
szdaily -> News -> 
CHINA TO SLAP ADDITIONAL TARIFFS ON $16B US GOODS IN RETALIATION
    2018-08-09  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

CHINA is slapping additional import tariffs of 25 percent on US$16 billion worth of U.S. goods ranging from oil and steel products to autos and medical equipment starting Aug. 23, the Commerce Ministry said yesterday.


“This is a very unreasonable practice,” the ministry said on its website www.mofcom.gov.cn, responding to the United States’ decision to slap 25-percent tariffs on another US$16 billion of Chinese goods Aug. 23.


The U.S. Trade Representative’s office made the announcement Tuesday as it published a final tariff list targeting 279 imported product lines.


The action is the latest by U.S. President Donald Trump to put pressure on China to negotiate trade concessions after imposing tariffs on US$34 billion in goods last month. China has vowed to retaliate to an equal degree.


The latest US$16 billion list will hit semiconductors from China, even though many of the basic chips in these products originate from the United States, or South Korea.


The 25-percent tariffs also will apply to a broad range of Chinese electronics, plastics, chemicals and railway equipment that the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) has said benefit from the “Made in China 2025” industrial plan, aimed at making China competitive in high-tech industries.


The U.S. Semiconductor Industry Association expressed disappointment at USTR’s decision to keep the sector on the tariff list.


“We have made the case to the administration, in the strongest possible terms, that tariffs imposed on semiconductors imported from China will hurt America’s chipmakers, not China’s,” SIA president John Neuffer said in a statement.


USTR removed a handful of items from its original list after a 46-day public comment and review period found they would cause “severe economic harm.”


“Whether you’re a farmer, a fisherman, or a factory worker one thing is clear — tariffs are counterproductive for long-term U.S. economic success,” Myron Brilliant, vice president for international affairs at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, said in a statement.


He urged the two sides to “get back to the negotiating table to work towards solutions.”


Matthew Shay, president and CEO of U.S. National Retail Federation, described the latest move by Trump as “another step toward throwing away the benefits of tax reform” and “a huge risk for American consumers and workers with no endgame in sight.”


“It’s time to stop digging a deeper hole while we can still climb out,” Shay said.


“Under the threat of tariffs, the U.S. is benching businesses and encouraging the Chinese to import goods from America’s foreign competitors,” Sage Chandler of the Consumer Technology Association said in a statement issued Monday.


The latest list brings the total Chinese imports that face a 25-percent tariff to about US$50 billion. (SD-Xinhua)

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