-
Advertorial
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Lifestyle
-
Tech and Vogue
-
TechandScience
-
CHTF Special
-
Nanshan
-
Futian Today
-
Hit Bravo
-
Special Report
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
World Economy
-
Opinion
-
Diversions
-
Hotels
-
Movies
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Weekend
-
Photo Highlights
-
Currency Focus
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Tech and Science
-
News Picks
-
Yes Teens
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Campus
-
Glamour
-
News
-
Digital Paper
-
Food drink
-
Majors_Forum
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Shopping
-
Business_Markets
-
Restaurants
-
Travel
-
Investment
-
Hotels
-
Yearend Review
-
World
-
Sports
-
Entertainment
-
QINGDAO TODAY
-
In depth
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Markets
-
Business
-
Culture
-
China
-
Shenzhen
-
Important news
在线翻译:
szdaily -> World -> 
German prosecutors probe Yazidi woman’s claim about her IS captor
    2018-08-20  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

GERMAN prosecutors said Saturday they were taking seriously a Yazidi refugee’s claim that she ran into her former Islamic State (IS) captor twice in Germany, but said they need more information to identify him.

The case of 19-year-old Ashwaq Haji Hami made headlines last week after she was quoted telling the Iraqi-Kurdish news portal basnews that she returned to her homeland of Iraq for fear that her alleged tormentor could harm her in Germany. Several reports in foreign media suggested that German authorities were unwilling to act on the woman’s claims.

“The young woman was interviewed but the information (she provided) wasn’t precise enough,” Frauke Koehler, a spokeswoman for federal prosecutors, told reporters Saturday.

Hami said she was captured by the Islamic State group in August 2014, and enslaved and abused by an IS member called Abu Humam, whose real name she said was Mohammed Rashid. After managing to escape from IS, she says she allegedly encountered her tormentor in Germany in 2016 and again in February this year in the southwestern German town of Schwaebisch Gmuend.

“I recognized his face very clearly and whenever I see him I can recognize him ... because of the beatings he gave us,” Hami said. “We saw him 24 hours a day. So anytime or anywhere I see him, I would be able to identify him.”

Hami said she reported the incidents to German police, but — citing fears for her safety — she moved back to Iraq in June.

Koehler rejected suggestions that German authorities weren’t interested in the case.

“If we’d seen an opportunity to arrest someone, we would immediately have done so,” she said, noting that German federal prosecutors opened a special investigation several years ago into alleged war crimes committed by Islamic State militants with the aim of bringing perpetrators to justice. One of the investigation’s elements is the killing of thousands of Yazidis by IS militants in 2014. Many more were taken into captivity, often kept as sex slaves.

(SD-Agencies)

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn