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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Business/Markets -> 
Taiwan chip talent wooed by mainland
    2018-09-05  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

A HUGE pay rise, eight free trips home a year and a heavily subsidized apartment. It was a dream job offer that a Taiwanese engineer simply could not refuse.

A veteran of Taiwan’s top-tier chipmakers, including United Microelectronics Corp., the unidentified engineer took up the offer from a State-owned mainland chipmaker last year and now oversees a small team at a wafer foundry in eastern China.

The engineer joined a growing band of senior Taiwan professionals working in the mainland’s booming and fast-developing semiconductor industry.

Attracting such talent from Taiwan has become a key part of an effort by mainland companies to put the industry into overdrive and reduce the country’s dependence on overseas firms for the prized chips that power everything from smartphones to military satellites.

That drive, which started in 2014, intensified this year as Sino-U.S. trade tensions escalated, according to recruiters and industry insiders.

China imported US$260 billion worth of semiconductors in 2017, more than its imports of crude oil. Home-made chips made up less than 20 percent of domestic demand in the same year, according to China Semiconductor Industry Association.

More than 300 senior engineers from Taiwan have moved to mainland chipmakers so far this year, joining nearly 1,000 others who have relocated since the Central Government set up a US$22 billion fund to develop the chip industry in 2014, according to H&L Management Consultants, a Taipei-based recruitment firm.

Tariffs imposed by Washington on US$16 billion worth of China’s imports have hit Chinese semiconductors, which are now subject to tariff rates of 25 percent.

That could disrupt the country’s semiconductor ambitions. The government’s aim is to have local chips comprise at least 40 percent of the country’s semiconductor needs by 2025.

Underscoring the talent crunch, two State-run institutions said in August that about 400,000 professionals were working in the mainland’s integrated circuit sector at the end of 2017, far short of the estimated 720,000 workers needed by 2020.

While the mainland has also targeted engineers from South Korea and Japan to address that shortage, it has had the most success in Taiwan thanks to a common language and culture, recruiters say.(SD-Agencies)

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