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在线翻译:
szdaily -> Lifestyle -> 
Kegel ball that tracks your fertility
    2018-09-07  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

A STARTUP has launched a new device called the Kegg, a Bluetooth-connected silicone kegel ball that monitors vaginal mucus to help determine a woman’s fertility by being inserted for no more than two minutes every day.

The device, when shipped in the near future, will sell for less than US$200.

For the uninitiated, a kegel ball is an object that a woman places in her vaginal passage. Designed to be held in place by a woman’s kegel muscles (also known as the pelvic floor), it helps to exercise those muscles and strengthen them — which can be useful for recovery after you’ve given birth, to keep from involuntarily peeing as you age, and to make sex more enjoyable.

The new product takes that one step further and creates another function by using it to measure mucus viscosity with the daily, two-minute measurements. Previous fertility tracking products are focused on tracking metrics like pulse and body temperature or your ovulation cycle to determine your fertility window.

Mucus is another important determinant of what is going on. As an egg gets released from a woman’s ovary, the consistency of the mucus changes. Not only does the viscosity give you an indication of where the egg is in its travels out of the ovary, but the more viscose it gets, the more viable it is for holding sperm to survive for longer before they connect with the egg.

Typically sperm do not survive for that long, and so the thicker the mucus, the bigger window you have for that sperm getting to the egg to fertilize it.

The Kegg comes with two gold bands on it that emit electric pulses that are used to measure the thickness of the mucus.

Using analyzer chips on a custom-designed PCB inside the Kegg, the device monitors the response from the mucus surrounding the Kegg’s sensors. It then “reads” the electro-chemical properties in the mucus to detect which electrolytes are present in the mucus. And this in turn is sent to the cloud for further processing through Kegg’s algorithm, ultimately determining the consistency of the mucus.

Kristina Cahojova, the CEO and founder of Lady Technologies, the startup behind the Kegg, says her team chose to focus on mucus because it’s too difficult, if not impossible, to use the other metrics to determine fertility if a woman has an irregular cycle.

(SD-Agencies)

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