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QINGDAO TODAY
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen -> 
Central African Republic: Proceed with caution
    2018-09-10  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

In 1910, the former French colonies in central Africa — originally French Gabon, French Congo, Oubangui-Chari and French Chad — banded together to form the federation known as French Equatorial Africa. French Cameroon was added after World War I. One can see the names of modern countries in most of these: Gabon, Congo, Chad and Cameroon.

But what in the world is Oubangui-Chari? Named after two rivers, it became the Central African Republic in 1958, just prior to independence in 1960. It is surrounded by former federation members on three sides: Chad (to the north), Cameroon (to the west), and the Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (to the south). South Sudan and Sudan lie to the east.

The country is still known by its French name, Republique Centrafricaine, and by the melodious nickname Centrafrique; in the national language, Sango (a creole based on the native tongue Ngbandi), it is Kodorosese ti Beafrika.

Since independence, the C.A.R. has undergone a series of upheavals that have earned it, as recently as this year, a place on most top 10 lists of dangerous countries in the world. The country’s first president exiled his political rivals and suppressed all opposition. In a 1965 coup d’etat, an army colonel took over, declaring himself president for life in 1972, and emperor Bokassa I of the Central African Empire in 1976. He was in turn overthrown in 1979, and his replacement was removed by another coup in 1981.

The country was ruled by a military junta until 1985, when a new constitution was prepared. Adopted in 1986, it provided for semi-free elections. Free elections were held in 1992, but declared null; another attempt in 1993 was more successful, and an opposition party won.

The new administration suffered no fewer than three mutinies, and in 1996 the Peace Corps evacuated all volunteers from the country, a state of affairs that remains true to this day. Since 1997, almost a dozen peacekeeping missions have intervened in the country’s affairs, responding to unrest, coup attempts and civil wars, one of which is ongoing.

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. before

2. continuing

3. rebellions within a government

4. experienced

5. joined

6. pleasant-sounding

7. gotten involved, interfered

8. struggles between factions within a country

9. quashed, put down

10. enforcements of peace by an international military force

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