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QINGDAO TODAY
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen -> 
Hoarding a recognized medical disorder
    2018-09-13  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

囤积也是一种病

Many of us struggle to part with treasured belongings, but for years Stephanie Evans felt compelled to hang on to just about everything she’d ever bought.

As a result her hallway and living room were crammed with towering stacks of books and magazines.

Her bedroom, meanwhile, was so full of piles of clothes that, until recently, she had to sleep on the sofa in the living room.

“I hated the way the clutter made me feel but I just couldn’t throw anything away — even if something was broken I couldn’t part with it,” says Stephanie, 51, a teaching assistant from Birmingham, the United Kingdom.

Stephanie, who is divorced, has a daughter aged 28, and only close family and friends had any idea of her problem as she ensured she always looked immaculate when she left for work.

In fact, hoarding is a recognized medical disorder — previously classed as a type of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), where people repeat certain behaviors or thoughts. But last month hoarding was recognized as a psychiatric disorder in its own right by the World Health Organization.

Hoarding disorder is defined as having an excessive number of items, having persistent difficulty throwing possessions away and storing them in a chaotic manner, to such an extent that this interferes with everyday living and causes significant distress or affects quality of life.

Those affected will collect anything, such as clothes, newspapers, photos, even printouts of emails, till receipts and grass cuttings, says Dr. Stuart Whomsley, an NHS clinical psychologist who practices in Corby, Northamptonshire.

“It is a psychological condition and not a lifestyle choice,” he adds. “It can be associated with other mental health conditions such as depression and social anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or OCD.”

Hoarders may also have perfectionist tendencies, be prone to procrastination and have problems planning and organizing.

Words to Learn

相关词汇

【抱住不放】bàozhù búfàng

hang on to cling tightly to something

【拖延症】tuōyánzhèng

procrastination the habitual and intentional delay of starting or finishing a task despite its negative consequences

我们很多人都不愿舍弃一些珍贵的物品,但多年以来,斯蒂芬妮•埃文斯总觉得必须把买回来的每件东西都留下来。

结果就是,她家的门厅和客厅塞满了高高摞起的书本杂志,卧室里的衣服堆积如山,最近她不得不睡在客厅沙发上。

51岁的斯蒂芬妮是英国伯明翰的一名助教。她说:“我讨厌周围乱七八糟的感觉,但我就是没办法扔掉任何一样东西,即使有些东西已经坏掉了,我也不想扔。”

斯蒂芬妮离异,有一个28岁的女儿。只有亲朋好友知道她有囤积症,因为她出门上班时总能把自己收拾得干净利落。

其实,囤积是医学上确认的失调症状,之前曾被归类为强迫症(重复某种行为或想法)的一种。但就在上月,世界卫生组织将其单独列为一种精神疾病。

囤积症的定义是,拥有的物品数量过多、一直很难扔掉物品以及杂乱地囤积物品,且到达了扰乱日常生活的程度,造成严重的痛苦或影响到生活质量。

在英国北安普敦郡的科比工作的英国国民保健体系临床心理学家斯图亚特•霍姆斯里博士说,囤积症患者会囤积任何东西,比如衣服、报纸、照片,甚至打印出的电邮、收据和碎草屑。

他补充说:“这是一种心理学病症,而不是一种生活方式。囤积症可能与其他的精神疾病有关,比如抑郁症、社交焦虑症、注意力缺陷多动症、创伤后应激障碍或者强迫症。”

囤积狂也可能有完美主义倾向,易患拖延症,无法做到有条不紊。

(Chinadaily.com.cn)

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