-
Important news
-
News
-
Shenzhen
-
China
-
World
-
Opinion
-
Sports
-
Kaleidoscope
-
Photo Highlights
-
Business
-
Markets
-
Business/Markets
-
World Economy
-
Speak Shenzhen
-
Leisure Highlights
-
Culture
-
Travel
-
Entertainment
-
Digital Paper
-
In depth
-
Weekend
-
Lifestyle
-
Diversions
-
Movies
-
Hotels
-
Special Report
-
Yes Teens
-
News Picks
-
Tech and Science
-
Glamour
-
Campus
-
Budding Writers
-
Fun
-
Futian Today
-
Advertorial
-
CHTF Special
-
FOCUS
-
Guide
-
Nanshan
-
Hit Bravo
-
People
-
Person of the week
-
Majors Forum
-
Shopping
-
Investment
-
Tech and Vogue
-
Junior Journalist Program
-
Currency Focus
-
Food Drink
-
Restaurants
-
Yearend Review
-
QINGDAO TODAY
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen -> 
Boudicca’s defeat
    2019-01-07  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

The most interesting facet of Boudicca’s defeat is Boudicca (or Boudica, or Boudicea, or Boadicea) herself.

That’s right, “herself,” because Boudicca was a woman, and one who had the temerity to take on the mighty Roman Empire in its heyday.

She was queen of a Celtic tribe in Roman-occupied Britain, a position she had inherited when her husband died. He had supposedly been an independent ally of Rome, but indications are that he was little more than a vassal. At his death, he bequeathed his kingdom to his two daughters and to the Roman emperor. But the Romans ignored the terms of the will, taking over the kingdom, flogging Boudicca, and raping her daughters. Some historians report that, in addition, gifts previously given by the emperor to individuals were confiscated, and Roman financiers called in all outstanding debts, crippling the kingdom.

In 60 or 61, while Suetonius, the Roman governor of Britain was out on a campaign, Boudicca led an uprising against the Roman occupation. Suetonius hurried back from the field in time to evacuate Londinium (modern London), the rebels’ next target, as he was greatly outnumbered and could not defend it.

Nevertheless, he managed to regroup his army and defeat the rebels in short order, securing Emperor Nero’s confidence in Suetonius’s rule and preventing a withdrawal of all troops from Britain.

The battle’s location is unknown. At least half a dozen sites have been suggested, but tradition places it somewhere near the middle of the so-called “Watling Street,” a Roman road of nearly 450 kilometers. Thus, Boudicca’s defeat is sometimes called “The Battle of Watling Street.”

Boudicca herself did not fare so well. Reports vary: either she died of illness shortly after the battle, or she poisoned herself. Either way, her revolt was over.

Her name, incidentally, may mean “victorious,” close in meaning to that of the 19th century British Queen Victoria. Thus, she became considered by some to be Victoria’s “namesake.” Statues were cast of her, ships named after her, and the Poet Laureate, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, wrote a poem about her.

Vocabulary:

Which word above means:

1. beating with a whip

2. six (perhaps approximately)

3. disabling, severely weakening

4. formed in a mold

5. aspect, feature

6. left in a will

7. reorganize

8. taken away

9. official poet of a nation

10. recklessness, nerve

深圳报业集团版权所有, 未经授权禁止复制; Copyright 2010, All Rights Reserved.
Shenzhen Daily E-mail:szdaily@szszd.com.cn