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szdaily -> Entertainment -> 
Peter Jackson to direct documentary about ‘Let It Be’ recording sessions
    2019-02-01  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

PETER JACKSON has signed up for a few hard days’ nights in the editing suite.

“The Lord of the Rings” filmmaker is set to direct a feature-length documentary based on 55 hours of never-released footage of The Beatles recording their seminal album “Let It Be” in 1969.

The film will be produced through a partnership between Jackson’s WingNut Films and Apple Corps. The companies say they have the complete cooperation of The Beatles principles and widows of Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono Lennon and Olivia Harrison.

The archival footage Jackson will use to build the film captures Britain’s most iconic band at a pivotal moment in its members’ careers. “Let It Be” was released in May 1970, several months after The Beatles had broken up. The filming — the only time the band was recorded at length while working in the studio — was originally intended for a TV special, but changed shape and became Michael Lindsay-Hogg’s “Let It Be” documentary film, culminating with The Beatles’ legendary performance on the roof of Apple’s Savile Row London office.

The original film has long been the subject of scrutiny among die-hard Beatles fans, who have searched for evidence of strain between the soon-to-break up bandmates. But Jackson says the source material actually provides a far more dynamic portrait. “I was relieved to discover the reality is very different to the myth,” he said Wednesday.

“After reviewing all the footage and audio that Michael Lindsay-Hogg shot 18 months before they broke up, it’s simply an amazing historical treasure-trove,” Jackson explained. “Sure, there are moments of drama — but none of the discord this project has long been associated with. Watching John, Paul, George and Ringo work together, creating now-classic songs from scratch, is not only fascinating — it’s funny, uplifting and surprisingly intimate.”

Jackson’s most recent release as a director was the World War I documentary “They Shall Not Grow Old,” which used a new set of digital techniques pioneered to transport forgotten WWI soldiers into the present-day — in vivid, ravishingly detailed color 3-D.

Jackson says he plans to leverage these same tools to restore the 16mm film on which The Beatles footage was shot.

“This movie will be the ultimate ‘fly-on-the-wall’ experience that Beatles fans have long dreamt about,” he said.

(SD-Agencies)

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