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szdaily -> Business/Markets -> 
Soaring demand for poultry to benefit feed sector
    2019-06-05  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

DEMAND for poultry is booming in southern China, home to a local specialty of salt-marinated chicken, as the Cantonese are increasingly looking for alternatives to pork.

As a result, poultry feed consumption in China is expected to grow 20 percent this year as people eat more chicken and duck, especially in southern provinces, Bloomberg News quoted Hou Xueling, an analyst with Everbright Futures Co., as saying yesterday.

Along with an increase in fish farming, that should keep demand for soybean meal, one of the most important ingredients in animal feed, at about 65 million to 67 million tons this year, compared with 70 million tons a year earlier, she said.

“The Cantonese have chicken teeth so there’s a consensus that a lot of people will replace pork with poultry meat,” Hou said. Guangdong, famous for its white sliced chicken and roasted duck, is one of the country’s biggest feed makers.

Companies in the food supply chain, from growers to traders and feed makers, are closely monitoring how African swine fever, harmless to humans but deadly for hogs, is changing diets in China.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimated in April that hog production in China would drop by 134 million head this year, equivalent to the entire annual output of American pigs, and the worst slump since it started counting the nation’s hogs in the mid-1970s. Beef imports already jumped to a record in April, while purchases of pork from overseas surged 24 percent from a year earlier.(SD-Agencies)

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