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QINGDAO TODAY
在线翻译:
szdaily -> Speak Shenzhen -> 
The Battle of Stirling Bridge
    2019-09-12  08:53    Shenzhen Daily

James Baquet

In March 1286, good King Alexander III of Scotland, who had brought peace and prosperity to his realm, fell from his horse and died. After 10 years of internal struggle over the succession, King Edward I of England (called “Longshanks” for his great height) took advantage of the power vacuum, sacked a border town, and forced the weak King John Balliol (called “Empty Coat” for his ineffectiveness) to abdicate. With acts of defiance, two Scottish patriots rose up: Andrew de Moray and William Wallace (the latter famously played by Mel Gibson in “Braveheart”).

In September 1297, the two heroes and their armies faced the English at Stirling, called “Gateway to the Highlands.” It was said that “he who holds Stirling holds Scotland,” and that is just what Moray and Wallace did in what has come to be called the Battle of Stirling Bridge.

The Scots camped on Abbey Craig, a high place north of the river; the English camped to the south. The English chose to attack directly across Stirling Bridge, even though it was only wide enough for two horsemen to ride abreast. It took several hours before the entire English army could cross, as the Scots watched and waited.

When a sufficient number of Englishmen had crossed — as many as the Scots thought they could defeat in battle — the Scots attacked, and held the bridge against the arrival of reinforcements. Only one English knight — with the colorful name Marmaduke Thweng — was able to fight his way back over the bridge, becoming the only knight to survive the battle. The English subsequently destroyed the bridge and retreated.

This victory of infantry over cavalry was a shocking lesson for the English. Perhaps 100 English cavalry and 5,000 infantry were killed. But Andrew de Moray died two months later of wounds received at Stirling, leaving Wallace to conduct raids on England which were, in the end, unsuccessful. Though by March of the following year he had become “Guardian of Scotland,” that summer he was defeated at Falkirk by an army under King Edward’s own command. Seven years later Wallace was captured and executed

Today, a national monument to Wallace, holding Wallace’s own sword, stands on Abbey Craig.

Vocabulary:

Which words above mean:

1. slang for “legs”

2. refusal to submit

3. a steep, rugged rock

4. attacked and looted

5. kingdom

6. side by side

7. give up one’s throne

8. entry, passage into

9. lack of effective leadership

10. people devoted to supporting their country

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